wyedean School

Aspire Together, Achieve Together

Wyedean is an academic & nurturing global school committed to
World Class C21st learning for all. We aim to turn dreams into futures.

Pupil Premium

 What is the Pupil Premium?

The Government provides Pupil Premium, in addition to main school funding, to help students achieve. The Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of students who have ever been eligible for free school meals over the past six years and children who have been continuously looked after for more than six months.

“The Pupil Premium is additional funding provided to schools to help improve outcomes for disadvantaged learners. It matters because in all my experience and research, disadvantaged young people do not lack talent or ability, but they do lack opportunity. The Pupil Premium forms a crucial part of a school’s strategy to provide better life chances and better life choices for less fortunate young people.” Marc Rowland https://marcrowland.wordpress.com/about-the-pupil-premium/

Service Premium

The Service Premium is paid to provide additional teaching and learning support for students whose parents are in the Armed Services.

Raising Standards

At Wyedean School and Sixth Form Centre we have high aspirations and ambitions for ALL our students and strive to ensure they are each given the best possible chance of achieving their potential. We are fully aware that students who qualify for the Pupil Premium Grant range enormously, in terms of academic ability and in the nature of support required. In the past two years, we have adopted a much more focused approach to address this variety of needs.

Responsibility for overseeing the work involving the Pupil Premium lies with the Acting Director of Raising Standards (RSL). We presented our work on transition and literacy, which has supported our students (PP and non-PP) who join us in Y7 to manage and thrive in the move to secondary school, at the Closing the Gap conference in 2016.  This project is now used widely in Gloucestershire by many primary and secondary schools. This project is part of a suite of initiatives led by the RSL which have been designed to raise achievement and standards for all.  Part of this, was a whole scale internal Pupil Premium Audit and Review, conducted in 2016, which was designed to take stock of the Pupil Premium work up until 2016 and make recommendations for the future.


“Used well, and as part of a broader strategy to tackle educational disadvantage, the Pupil Premium offers an opportunity to overcome the greatest challenge for our education system: the achievement gap between the poorest pupils and their peers.” Marc Rowland, https://marcrowland.wordpress.com/about-the-pupil-premium/

Headline figures show that at the end of secondary school, around 39% of disadvantaged pupils achieve the basic measure of 5A*-C including English and Maths at GCSE annually. The figure their more fortunate peers is 66%. At Wyedean School, the performance compares favourably with the national picture over the same period, with disadvantaged pupils achieving 44.5% (vs 39% nationally).

At Wyedean School, we are firmly committed to removing any gaps in attainment, this statement sums up our Pupil Premium work: “It takes everyone to work in unison, at their optimum ability, to ensure the best possible outcomes for vulnerable children –irrespective of their starting points and irrespective of their background.” Marc Rowland.

Attainment of Pupil Premium Students at Wyedean 2014

 

Summer 2014 Threshold measure

Pupil Premium

Non-Pupil Premium

Gap

5 A*-C including English and maths

53%

74%

22%

Value added Best 8 GCSE

3.3

4.0

0.7

Pupil Premium Allocation

93,500

 

Attainment of Pupil Premium Students at Wyedean 2015

 

Summer 2015 Threshold measure

Pupil Premium

Non-Pupil Premium

Gap

5 A*-C including English and maths

53%

74%

22%

Value added Best 8 GCSE

3.0

4.0

1

Pupil Premium Allocation

94,435

View or download Pupil Premium Grant Expenditure Report 2014-15 HERE

Attainment of Pupil Premium Students at Wyedean 2016

RaiseOnline, owned by OFSTED tells us our key strengths for exam results in Summer 2016

Summer 2016 Threshold measure

Pupil Premium

Non-Pupil Premium School

Non Pupil Premium Nationally (‘other’)

5 GCSEs A*-C

53%

67%

69% Gap = 14%

Attainment 8

45.07 = Average Grade 4 across best 8 subjects

50.42 = Average Grade 5 across best 8 subjects

50.97 = Average Grade 5 across best 8 subjects Gap = -0.5

Pupil Premium Allocation

112,170

The gap in 2016 has reduced, but the measures have also changed. It is important to continue to prioritise our work to raise standards for all students, including those in receipt of the Pupil and Service Premium.

 View or download Pupil Premium Grant Expenditure Report 2015-16

 Pupil Premium Performance at Wyedean School 2013-2015

All data is available in the public domain at: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/resources/families-of-schools-database/wyedean-school-and-th-form-centre-np16-7aa/

During the past three year period between 2013-16 Wyedean School has achieved phenomenal results for Pupil Premium, which have improved dramatically. In all measures for this period, Wyedean School has beaten national average gaps for Pupil Premium attainment and the gaps in attainment and progress are shrinking.  In our attempts to diminish the difference, we have managed to reduce gaps in many subjects, as well as improve performance for all students.  It is crucial to note two points before reading this data.  Firstly, this is data over a three year period as an average.  There are years with exceptional performance and some with less so.  It is important to us here at Wyedean that we see consistently excellent attainment for PP students over time, which is stable – thus, we will never become complacent.  Secondly, the measures here are not challenging enough.  To measure our PP students against our own non – PP students is not a rigorous enough measure.  Now, the government will expect us to measure and track our PP performance against National Non-PP performance to ensure we are aiming to diminish any differences.  Thus, strong performance on the measures below, while pleasing, is not the whole story.  Since 2015 we have worked tirelessly to sustain and further improve academic outcomes for all students, including our most vulnerable learners.

Value Added PP, and non PP students

 

Achievement in Best 8 GCSE point score

The following charts map our attainment for PP students against statistically similar schools, over the three year period (2013-15). We are the orange bar; our most similar school is shown in blue.  The further to the left of the chart on any measure is positive, as the chart is ordered by ‘attainment gap,’ which means the smallest gap is furthest to the left.  In the chart below we can see that in relation to similar schools, who attract similar cohorts of students, Wyedean performs exceptionally well.  We have a gap of 4.2 in our score for the Best 8 GCSEs, the best similar school has a gap of 4.1. The national average line is shown in blue.

 

Value Added (Best 8 GCSEs)

The following chart shows the value added by Wyedean School for PP and non PP students in this three year period. PP students have a score of 0.5 for VA, while non – PP have 2.3, with a gap of 1.9 which is the 10th lowest gap in our statistical family.

 

 

 

 5 A*-C GCSE and Equiv

The following chart shows Wyedean School performance over the three year period, and again, our gaps are very low in our statistical group. We have a gap of 15% between the performance of PP and non PP student attainment in 5 GCSEs A%-C.  Although we are pleased this gap is reducing, we want to see no difference in performance at all.

Achievement in English

The following charts map our attainment for PP students against statistically similar schools, over the three year period (2013-15). We are the orange bar; our most similar school is shown in blue.  The further to the left of the chart on any measure is positive.  In the chart below we can see that in relation to similar schools, who attract similar cohorts of students, Wyedean performs exceptionally well in English, coming in at the top of our statistical group.  This is a major achievement, reflective of the close tracking, high expectations and innovative methods to raise attainment of Pupil Premium students within the English department.  We have a gap of 3% in this period, which is the lowest attainment gap in our statistical family. The national average line is shown in blue.

 

Achievement in Maths

The following charts map our attainment for PP students against statistically similar schools, over the three year period (2013-15). We are the orange bar; our most similar school is shown in blue.  The further to the left of the chart on any measure is positive.  In the chart below we can see that in relation to similar schools, who attract similar cohorts of students, Wyedean performs exceptionally well in maths, coming in almost at the top of our statistical group.  This is a major achievement, reflective of the close tracking, high expectations and innovative methods to raise attainment of Pupil Premium students in maths.  We have a gap of 11% in this period, which is the second lowest attainment gap in our statistical family. The national average line is shown in blue.

 

Governance

Our governors understand their role in holding us to account for our use of the Pupil and Service Premium. We have a link governor for Pupil Premium, who works closely with the Raising Standards Leader to review and identify concerns through the year for this important group of students.  Governors are aware of the issues surrounding the spending of the Pupil and Service Premium, and progress data when shared with the governing body is presented with PP vs Non – PP National gaps in mind.  This allows governors to challenge the school leaders and also identify where support for subjects and year groups may be concentrated.  This link is particularly helpful to explain the role of governance: https://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/2016/oct/18/how-should-schools-spend-pupil-premium-funding?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

 

 How we spend the Pupil Premium at Wyedean School

 View or download Pupil Premium Grant Expenditure Report 2016-17

We apply careful principles to our Pupil Premium spend, basing academic spend decisions on the professional judgement of our staff, resources spend decisions on the need of the individual child, and spending our allocation of the Pupil Premium in ways we know over time have had a sustainable impact on progress for these students.

We use a rigorous method to track the impact of interventions (academic, pastoral and other) which have been put in place funded by, or part funded by the Pupil Premium. We track the progress of the students in terms of their grades in subjects, but we also measure the efficacy of an intervention (H/L) and whether we believe it should continue. Students are engaged as a part of this process.

Some of the interventions we put into place are academic, some are to support other needs and all are regularly assessed for their impact on student wellbeing and progress. Student welfare and progress is discussed regularly for Year 7 – 13 by key professionals in Raising Standards meetings which happen at intervals through the year.

We deploy a range of interventions for all year groups that combine challenge and support, with a view to maximising progress. In order to measure impact, these interventions are monitored regularly and adapted accordingly. As a result, the interventions are having an impact; improving the performance and wellbeing of students in receipt of Pupil and Service Premium. Whilst we are pleased with the results in many areas, we are also aware that work still needs to be done to address extant gaps in other areas. The staff are fully committed to eradicate the attainment gap. Student welfare and progress is discussed regularly for Year 7 – 13 for all students, not only those in receipt of the Pupil and Service Premium by key professionals in Raising Standards meetings which happen at intervals through the year. Those who need to receive additional support can then have timely and relevant support or intervention, with a view to adequate progress being made for the student to close any gaps in knowledge.